"A Piece of the World" by Christina Baker Kline

 The cover shows a landscape with an unsettled sky and a lush, grassy hill with a simple, old clapboard house at the top, the kind that has housed children, their parents and grandparents over generations. For many, it will strongly suggest the setting of Andrew Wyeth’s iconic painting, “Christina’s World.”  But where is Christina, the woman he shows uneasily stretched out in that field?

Christina Baker Kline chose to create the story of the woman depicted by the masterful painter in her fifth novel, “A Piece of the World.” Kline developed a fascination with Christina Olson, who shares her birthplace of Maine as well as her name, and with the story of the woman’s friendship with the celebrated Pennsylvania painter starting in the 1940’s. Kline’s thorough research of Christina’s family, Wyeth’s art, and his life filled in only some of the blanks, so she used her knowledge of the post-war period in America, gained through writing the bestselling “Orphan Train”, and her imagination to give depth to Christina’s life.

Readers follow Christina as a young woman who bears the burden of a body that doesn’t work right, due to a serious genetic condition that surfaced in childhood, causing the lower half of her body to be twisted. She is a loner who has few close friends and over the decades she lives a quiet life in the family house with her bachelor brother Al. Wyeth drops into her life one summer when she is close to fifty. It starts with his knock on the door and his brisk look through the house, before he lays claim on an unused upstairs room as his summertime studio. He returns year after year as a welcome interruption to her colorless life.

The beauty of this book lies in Kline’s subtle handling of the ebb and flow of the life that Christina has chosen for herself: to stay with her brother in the rundown, family home, lacking electricity and running water that screams out for upkeep and repair. With simple yet beautiful language, she conveys the dedication the two siblings have for one another that is never acknowledged. There are long periods of silence and occasional reprimands, but the depth of their affinity for one another is palpable.

The relationship Christina has with Wyeth is also subtly yet strongly shown. She is a generation older than Andy, whom she sees as a quirky, impassioned man who asks for nothing from her but an upstairs room each day, some home cooking, and space for his moodiness and solitude. Kline delicately reminds us how love can come in different ways.

For a story in which life is so hard for the characters, it is a marvel that Kline shows us that in the bleak simplicity of Christina’s world, the important things in one’s life are more easily seen. Her novel is a beautifully imagined picture of one woman’s life.