"Before We Were Yours" by Lisa Wingate

Two storylines vie for our attention in Lisa Wingate’s hugely popular novel, “Before We Were Yours” (2017). One takes place in 1939 on the shores of the Mississippi River in Tennessee where a twelve-year-old girl, Rill Foss, and her four younger siblings are taken from their houseboat by men who identify as police. The children have been left alone because their mother is having a difficult birth and her father has gone to a hospital with her, so they believe they’ll be taken to the hospital where their parents are. Instead, they are dropped off at a children’s home where it soon becomes clear that the woman in charge, Miss Tann, has other plans for them.

The alternating storyline plays out in present day South Carolina, where Avery Stafford, a practicing attorney, has taken a leave-of-absence from her job in order to help her father, a busy congressman who’s recently been diagnosed with cancer. Avery is being groomed to follow in his footsteps, and she dives in to support her father in his public appearances. The marriage that she and her fiancé Elliot had intended to plan is noticeably pushed aside.

The link between the two stories appears early, in the form of an elderly woman, May Crandall, whom Avery meets at one of her father’s appearances at a nursing home. In an alert moment, May mistakes Avery for her deceased sister Fern. Avery becomes increasingly interested in May and her story when she sees a faded old photo of May with her own grandmother Judy in it.

This story is sometimes hard to read, as readers watch the children being taken from their families, mistreated where they are warehoused, and, only if they are lucky, sent to live with new families who have paid for them. It is harder still to accept that this is based on the true story of Georgia Tann and her Tennessee Children’s Home Society in Memphis where, for thirty years, children who were often abducted were sold to wealthy couples who yearned for a child of their own. Wingate says that the Foss children were a figment of her imagination, but their abduction, their experiences in the children’s home—cruel treatment, sexual abuse, punishment, even death—come from true stories of children she uncovered in her thorough research.

Wingate connects the two stories seamlessly, making it a compelling read and a perfect choice for book clubs. I highly recommend it.